Course Syllabus

  • Below is a draft of the partial syllabus available to the public.
  • If you are registered in this course, then go to the "Schedule and Syllabus" webpage (look in the left navigation panel) to view the full syllabus.

ESRM 320, Marketing and Human Resources from a Sustainability Perspective (5 credits, NW and I&S). This is an online course that has two mandatory in person exams, 4:30-6:50 pm, on 11.7 and 12.7, in 223 Anderson Hall. There is no cumulative final exam during UW’s final exam week.

Required Textbook: Nickels, William, James McHugh, and Susan McHugh (2015), Understanding Business (11th Edition), NY: McGraw-Hill. Only the 11th edition. There is a reserve copy of Understanding Business on reserve at the Foster Business School Library.

COURSE GOALS & LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Overview: Marketing and Management. In ESRM 320, we explore two of the four primary business dimensions: marketing and human resource management (companion course ESRM 321 explores finance and accounting). Marketing refers to promoting, pricing, and distributing new and existing products and services that are aimed at satisfying consumers’ wants, needs, and objectives. Human resource management refers to developing, managing, and motivating human capital and resources. Sustainability refers to integrating environmental, social, and financial elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations. Integrating these three is called the triple bottom line. In business, the bottom line refers to net income or profits because it is the last (i.e., bottom) line in a company's income statement; profits are essential because a business is unsustainable without them. Sustaining the planet over the long term depends not on one but all three bottom lines. We will explore the meaning and importance of sustainable business practices that respect and adhere to best environmental science methods and ethical social responsibility standards. The context for this exploration will be assessing data in corporate sustainability reports. Companies that trade on U.S. stock exchanges are required by law to report financial performance, but no laws exist for reporting social responsibility and environmental performance. However, in response to stakeholders many corporations voluntarily issue annual sustainability reports that provide information on the company’s environmental and social responsibility practices and performance.

Course Goals. ESRM 320 has two goals, which are to provide a context for 1) learning business concepts (through watching the recorded business lectures and reading the Nickels textbook) AND 2) hands on experience assessing corporate sustainability performance (through assessing GRI indicators using sustainability report information). The business learning objectives below in bold are achieved through listening to the recorded business lectures and reading the Nickels textbook (both of which are covered on the exams that comprise about 55% of the course grade) while the sustainability learning objectives underlined below are achieved through assessing GRI indicators using sustainability report information and the associated SPA quizzes and SPI paper (45% of the course grade). Exams do not cover SPA, and the SPA quizzes do not cover business concepts. Note that SPA and SPI are described in detail throughout this syllabus.

Learning Objectives (at the end of this course, students should be able to do the following).

  • Explain marketing, human resources, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability concepts
  • Summarize how a market orientation and commitment to sustainability can enhance customer and employee satisfaction
  • Describe how consumer markets are segmented, targeted, and products positioned to satisfy individual, government, and business consumers’ wants and needs
  • Compare techniques for creating value-added products, services, and ideas; valuing environmental and social externalities and managing traditional pricing; developing distribution strategies and “greening” the supply chain; and creating and implementing promotion campaigns
  • Define managerial and leadership styles and theories of motivation, persuasion, and influence
  • Summarize the human resource process of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, motivating, and evaluating employees
  • Describe Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework for sustainability reporting
  • Assess GRI human rights, labor practices, product responsibility, and society indicators to measure actual sustainability performance
  • Analyze real world sustainability performance using data in corporate sustainability reports
  • Summarize and interpret sustainability performance data

GRADING

Points, Percent, and Final Course GPA. Students receive points for assignment(s), exam(s) and quizzes as described in the first table below. Those points are converted to a final course GPA grade using the University of Washington’s Standard Grade Scale (see http://www.washington.edu/admin/rules/policies/SGP/ScholRegCH110.html).

 

ASSIGNMENTS, EXAMS, QUIZZES, AND EXTRA CREDIT

POSSIBLE POINTS

Exam 1

300 points

Exam 2

300 points

Sustainability Performance Assessment (SPA) Quizzes

300 points

Sustainability Performance Interpretation Paper

300 points

Syllabus, SPA Data file, and Course Website Quiz

  50 points

TOTAL POINTS

1250 points

Extra credit points for: 1) completing the "Preparing for the Exam" Extra Credit Quiz (24 points), completing the “SPA Feedback” Extra Credit Survey (30 points), and 3) attending the live “Welcome to ESRM 321” and the SPA Research Mentoring Conferences (10 points each, possible 60 total points)

0-114 points

 

% EARNED (% of total points possible, which shows in course website’s Grading section)

UW GPA

UW LETTER GRADE, from http://www.washington.edu/admin/rules/policies/SGP/ScholRegCH110.html

100-98

4.0

A

97-96

3.9

A

95-94

3.8

A-

93-92

3.7

A-

91

3.6

A-

90-89

3.5

A-

88-87

3.4

B+

86

3.3

B+

85

3.2

B+

84

3.1

B

83

3.0

B

82

2.9

B

81

2.8

B-

80

2.7

B-

79

2.6

B-

78

2.5

B-

77

2.4

C+

76

2.3

C+

75

2.2

C+

74

2.1

C

73

2.0

C

72

1.9

C

71

1.8

C-

70

1.7

C-

69

1.6

C-

68

1.5

C-

67

1.4

D+

66

1.3

D+

65

1.2

D+

64

1.1

D

63

1.0

D

62

0.9

D

61

0.8

D-

60

0.7

D-

59 and below

0.0

F

LATE POLICY FOR EXAMS, QUIZZES, AND OTHER ASSIGNMENTS

The late policy strives for clarity and fairness: late assignments/exams are accepted only when accompanied by a physician/official person documented emergency (must be a signed, paper copy with contact information) that communicates how the emergency resulted in the student’s inability to meet the due date. All documentation will be verified by the professor. A makeup exam will be created only for students who meet the emergency-based late policy and NOT for travel, other engagements, being late for an exam and unable to enter Anderson Hall before the doors are locked by UW Security at 5 pm, and other non-emergency situations.

Makeup exams take an additional eight hours to verify a student’s late policy documentation, schedule the makeup exam, create a new makeup exam and answer key for grading, proctor the 2.5 hour exam, grade the makeup exam, etc. Therefore, in a large class like this we do not have sufficient time and resources to offer multiple makeup exams. Said another way, we schedule ONE makeup exam for all students who meet the late policy, and that makeup exam will take place within one week of the original exam. If you are unable to take the makeup exam as scheduled, then you must provide supplemental documentation meeting the late policy guidelines that Dr. Paun can verify.

READINGS

The readings below appear in the syllabus Schedule’s middle column, called “How to Prepare for Class.” The How to Prepare column shows two types of readings: “Read” and “Optional.” Read means that the reading is required and may be tested on the exam. Optional means that the reading will not be on the exam, but a quick overview reading will be beneficial and a full reading if you are interested in the topic. All of the following readings, except the required Nickels textbook, are available on the course website in the Readings section.

Besio, Cristina and Andrea Pronzini (2014), “Morality, Ethics, and Values Outside and Inside Organizations: an Example of the Discourse on Climate Change,” Journal of Business Ethics, (February), 287-300.

Descriptions of Sustainability (2015), author unknown.

Ernst and Young (2014), The Value of Sustainability Reporting. Boston: Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College.

GRI Manual (Social Indicators) (2014). Amsterdam: Global Reporting Initiative. This file contains pages 1-16, 62-63, and 142-266.

Knights, Mikell (2014), “Making Renewable and Recyclable Cartons Sustainable.” Food Engineering, (March), 19.

KPMG (2013), The KPMG Survey of Corporate Responsibility Reporting 2013. Zug, Switzerland: KPMG International.

Lovegrove, Nick and Matthew Thomas (2013), “Triple-Strength Leaders,” Harvard Business Review, (September), 46-56.

Mangla, Ismat Sarah (2014), "Capture Those Fleeting Deals," Money, (September), 25-26.

Nickels, William, James McHugh, and Susan McHugh (2015), Understanding Business (11th Edition), NY: McGraw-Hill. Only the 11th edition. There is a reserve copy of Understanding Business on reserve at the Foster Business School Library.

Paun, Dorothy (2017), SPA Data file (Sustainability Performance Assessment, SPA System. This is an Excel file called SPA Data that is on the course website’s Readings section.

Paun, Dorothy, Shannon Bray, Tomoki Yamaguchi, and Simiao You (2016), “A Sustainability Performance Assessment Tool: The SPA System,” Journal of Sustainability Education, Volume 12 (December), 1-20.

Paun, Dorothy (2015), Leadership Preferences Questionnaire.

Paun, Dorothy (2015), Motivation Preferences Questionnaire.

Pfitzer, Marc, Valerie Bockstette, and Mike Stamp (2013), “Innovating for Shared Value,” Harvard Business Review, (September), 100-107.

Roberts, Carter (2016), "How to Save the World's Forests With Tires," Time Magazine, July 25.

Sengupta, Sumantra (2013), “10 Trends for the Next 10 Years.” Logistics Management, (July), 58-64.

Shacklett, Mary (2014), “Painting the Supply Chain Green,” World Trade 100, (May), 14-19.

Small, Vanessa (2013), “Volunteerism Has Changed Since 1989,” Washington Post, (July 25), pages unknown.

Steinmetz, Katy (2014), "Recycle. Reuse. Reprofit," Time Magazine, (August 4), 20.

Sustainability Reports of (Carlsberg, General Mills, and Nestle).

Waddock, Sandra (2011), “We Are All Stakeholders of Gaia: A Normative Perspective on Stakeholder Thinking,” Organization & Environment, Volume 24 (2), 192-21.

SCHEDULE

Schedule Notes

  • Exams consist of multiple choice and essay questions. There is extensive exam information, and sample questions, on the website’s “Exam Info” webpage. No exams will be given after the due date unless the conditions of the emergency-based late policy are met. It is difficult to pass the exam by only reading the required Nickels textbook and not watching the recorded lectures. Why? Because material supplementing the textbook readings is provided in the required recorded business lectures. There are many required recorded lectures, so students should listen to those recorded lectures regularly over time as compared to watching all recorded lectures in a few days before the exam.
  • Modules. The Module tab is located in the left navigation panel on the course website. The purpose of modules is to guide students through the lectures and assignments over the quarter. The Schedule below lists the dates and content for each module.
  • Required Recorded Business Lectures (all are required). Panopto recorded lectures are available by clicking on the lecture links within the module associated with each class. When you watch a recorded lecture you can slow down or speed up the recording, see all of the PowerPoint slides using a slider bar, search to find items within a recording, etc. The PowerPoint slides used in all recorded lectures are available in the Lecture Slides section on the course website. Note that mobile devices do not play Panopto recorded lectures.
  • Required Video Case Studies (some are required others are optional). If a video case study is listed in syllabus' Schedule section as "required,” then it may be on the exam. If a video case study is listed as “optional,” then it will not be on the exam.
  • SPA Conferences. The live online, interactive conferences provide mentoring for the SPA assignments. They begin at 4:30 pm. To join a SPA conference, accept the conference invite emailed to you. A Panopto recording of each SPA live conference will be available approximately two hours after the live conference has ended.
  • SPA Quizzes. SPA refers to the Sustainability Performance Assessment assignment, which is described at the end of this syllabus.
    • SPA quizzes happen throughout the quarter (the Schedule below lists quiz dates), and each quiz is available to take from 6-7 pm on the date each quiz is due. Canvas will automatically close SPA quizzes at 7 pm. If a student does not finish a quiz by 7 pm, then Canvas will give only partial points for the quiz answers correctly answered before 7 pm. No quizzes can be taken after 7 pm on their respective due dates unless the conditions of the late policy are met. Students will have two attempts to answer each quiz question, if a question is not answered correctly during the first attempt, and the highest quiz score is retained.
    • It is suggested that students begin each quiz at 6 pm so they have the maximum quiz time of one hour, to 7 pm. Correct quiz answers are shown the same evening at 10:05 pm.
    • Students should read the SPA assignment info at the end of this syllabus and the SPA Data file, but here is a brief summary of the workflow related to taking a quiz. 1) In advance of each quiz, students assess sustainability performance by entering their assessed points in the SPA Data file, 2) then students upload their SPA Data file on the course website (uploading the file is a prerequisite for opening a quiz), and 3) then students take the quiz. It is not possible to do steps 1) to 3) in one hour; the 6-7 pm timeframe is for entering quiz answers (assess points), and reviewing work for incorrect answers entered on the first attempt and not for doing all of the work associated with each quiz. Students can do steps 1) to 2) in advance (e.g., days or even weeks ahead of the quizzes).
    • There is one quiz which is not part of the SPA assignment, called the Syllabus, SPA Data File, and Course Website Quiz.
  • SPI Paper Assignment. SPI refers to the Sustainability Performance Interpretation paper assignment. Details about the SPI assignment are at the end of this syllabus. No SPI papers will be accepted after the due date/ time unless the conditions of the late policy are met.

 

WHAT

HOW TO PREPARE

9.28

TH

MODULE 1

Dr. Paun and TA Yang Su will hold an online conference starting at 4:30 pm to say hello and welcome you to ESRM 320, review the syllabus, SPA Data file, and course website materials, and answer questions

·  Read Paun 2016 (a Journal of Sustainability Education article that describes the SPA System used in this course

10.3

TU

MODULE 2

Required Recorded Business Lecture: The Dynamic Business Environment

·  Read Nickels Chapter 1

10.5

TH

MODULE 3

Required Recorded Business Lectures: 1) Overview of Sustainability Reporting and 2) Introduction to the Case Study Companies

· Read the three case study company sustainability reports (about one hour each)

10.10

TU

MODULE 4

Conference Presentation: SPA 1 (Sustainability Performance Assessment), GRI Sustainability Reporting and Overview of the SPA and SPI Assignments

·  Read GRI Manual pages 1-16

··  Read the SPA Data file

·  Read the three sustainability reports (about one hour each)

10.12

TH

MODULE 5

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Corporate Social Responsibility

·  Read Nickels Chapter 4

10.17

TU

MODULE 6

Conference Presentation: SPA 2, Mentoring Exercises in Assessing the Human Rights (HR) Indicators

·  Read GRI Manual pages 173-197 (Human Rights Indicators)

 

10.19

TH

MODULE 7

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Management and Leadership

· Read Nickels Chapter 7

10.24

TU

MODULE 8

Conference Presentation: SPA 3, Mentoring Exercises in Assessing the Labor Practices (LA) Indicators

·  Read GRI Manual pages 142-172 (Labor Practices Indicators)

TH

MODULE 9

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Organizational Design

·  Read Nickels Chapter 8

10.31

TU

MODULE 10

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Motivation

·  Read Nickels Chapter 10

11.2

TH

MODULE 11

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Human Resource Management

·  Read Nickels Chapter 11

11.7

TU

Module 12

Exam 1

11.9

TH

MODULE 14

Conference Presentation: SPA 4, Mentoring Exercises in Assessing the Product Responsibility (PR) Indicators

·  Read GRI Manual pages 221-235 (Product Responsibility Indicators)

11.14

TU

MODULE 13

Required Recorded Business Lectures: 1) Marketing Mix, Process, and Research and 2) Segmenting, Targeting, and Positioning

·  Read Nickels Chapter 13

11.16

TH

MODULE 15

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Product Overview and New Product Development

·    Read Nickels Chapter 14

11.21

TU

MODULE 16

Conference Presentation: SPI Paper Question and Answer Conference

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Product Life Cycle

·    Read Nickels Chapter 14

11.23

TH

THANKSGIVING

 

11.28

TU

MODULE 17

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Pricing and Environmental Externalities

· Read Nickels Chapter 14

11.30

TH

MODULE 18

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Channels of Distribution

· Nickels Chapter 15

12.5

TU

MODULE 19

Required Recorded Business Lecture: Promotion

· Read Nickels Chapter 16

12.7

TH

Module 20

Exam 2

 

 

Course Summary:

Date Details