Course Syllabus

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Spring, 2013

Seminar Facilitators:      Elizabeth West           eawest@uw.edu
                                         Cathy Kim                  ckim00@uw.edu

Meeting Times:  Wednesdays:  12:00-2:00

Dates: April 10, 17, & 24; May 1, 15, & 29; June 5 and potentially the 12th

Location:  112A

Textbook:  Ko, S. & Rossen, S. (2010).  Teaching Online: A Practical Guide.  Routledge.

                                               Additional readings and resources will posted on Resources Page.

Seminar Description

The purpose of this seminar is to assist and support you in the process of developing or redesigning a course for an online or hybrid format.  Each of you will have your own unique “deliverables” which align with your project.

The seminar is designed to offer multiple opportunities to discuss and discover your own answers to critical redesign questions within a learning community of peers and collaborators. It is an “inquiry-based,” collaborative, and “project-based” learning environment in which each module revolves around key redesign challenges and questions, group discussions and activities, and the creation of redesign course materials (e.g., your syllabus, schedule, learning activities, and modules). These materials will in turn be the groundwork for implementation of the project.

Seminar Goals

Within a collaborative and inquiry-based learning environment, participants will be able to discuss online and hybrid course design decisions, identify the elements of pedagogically effective online and hybrid courses, and make sound design decisions in constructing their own course materials. In addition, with practice and feedback, participants will also gain or enhance their skills in facilitating and managing online discussions, in designing learning activities, and in providing feedback and communicating with students.

Design Materials

Participants who successfully complete this Seminar will come away with materials that will include the following (note – this can be adjusted given participants’ prior knowledge or goals):

  • a draft of a learning module or unit
  • a plan for preparing and supporting students to participate in the online or hybrid course
  • a redesign course “blueprint,” including an outline of major content areas, goals and objectives, and a plan for assessing learning outcomes
  • strategies for integrating online learning activities with face-to-face components of the course
  • a set of guidelines for successful student participation and an assessment rubric for managing and evaluating online discussions
  • a draft of a syllabus and week-by-week schedule of topics and activities

Seminar Structure

This 8-week seminar includes face-to-face sessions.  

There are nine modules in the seminar (see the schedule for a list of topics and meetings), and many of the modules follow the general process illustrated below.

  • Pedagogy – identify strategies that facilitate learning for your students in a f2f environment
  • Explore and Learn about Tools –develop a knowledge base about what tools are available to support your pedagogy
  • Merge- adopt a supporting technology
  • Craft –build the access
  • Peer Review and Revise– focus on creating and revising your course materials
  • Reflect

 

Building a Community of Learners:  Expectations and Responsibilities

It is our hope that the spring seminar will result in an actively engaged community of learners, and that the activities making up the seminar will enable each of you to learn from us and from each other what you need to know to successfully create a course. Toward that end, it is very important that you attend all of the face-to-face meetings and that you participate fully in all online activities. We hope that you will find the meetings and the online activities stimulating and thought-provoking, and that they will help you get your project off to a good start. Please look for opportunities throughout the seminar to share what you already know about teaching and learning with technology¾and to share, as well, what you do not know but need to learn. In this fashion, all of us will come to a better understanding of what constitutes an effective online and/or hybrid course, and a better understanding of how to create one.

Overview of Modules

Module 1: Understanding the Design Process

  • Pedagogy drives the technology
  • Affordances, difficulties and unique opportunities for our courses (discussed session 2)
  • Introduction to Canvas
  • Identify your “deliverable”

Module 2: Planning – The Big Picture

  • Course Goals and content
  • Develop modules – content (broad to specifics)
  • Quality Matters

Module 3: Constructing the Course Blueprint

  • Course objectives and assessment strategies
  • A learning cycle
  • Module development

Module 4: Develop Course Documents

  • Creating an effective online syllabus
  • The schedule
  • Course procedures
  • Rubrics

Module 5: Activate Learning

  • What kinds of activities are possible?
  • Discussion groups – facilitating online discussions
    • Balance of student centered – instructor centered
  • Blogs

Module 6: Building an Online Community

  • Fostering a sense of community
  • Team design – groups and dividing students
  • E-mail, chat, conferencing and more
  • Supervision/assessment

 

Module 7: Accessibility and Universal Design for Learning

 

Module 8: Course Flow and Build

  • Areas and content – the platform/LMS
  • Student orientation considerations – preparing them
  • Communication tools – web 2.0 tools and others
  • Instructor presence/student identity

Module 9: Showcase, Celebrate and Plan

 

Seminar Calendar

Date/Module

Activities

Assignment Due

Readings

April 10 – Module 1

Understanding the Design Process

Identify your deliverable(s)

Getting Started with Canvas – playing in the sandbox

Special features – Canvas with Tyler Fox, Instructional Technologist Learning Technologies, UW-IT

 

Deliverable identified

 

 

April 17 – Module 2

Planning – The Big Picture

Affordances, difficulties and unique opportunities for our courses

Course Goals and content

Develop modules – content (broad to specifics)

Quality Matters

 

Affordances and Difficulties

Peer Review – complete draft of summary worksheet for course goals/content

List of Modules

Review QM Rubric

QM Lit. Review

Review the NETS Standards (URL)

Text – Ch. 3

April 24 -  Module 3

Constructing Course Blueprint

Develop course blueprint

Learning cycles

Module development

Peer Review – Course Blueprint

 

Wagner, Vanevenhoven & Bronson, 2010

May 1 –   Module 4

Developing Course Documents

Creating a syllabus and schedule

 

Course procedures

 

Rubrics

Peer Review –

Module Development

Text – Ch. 5

Mintu-Wimsatt, Kenek & Lozado, 2010

May 15 - Module 5

Activate Learning

What kinds of activities are possible?

 

Discussion groups

Peer Review-complete draft of discussion board “how-to” and rubric

Text – Ch. 7

Backchannel Communication

May 29 – Module 6

Building an Online Community

 

Fostering a sense of community

 

Team design – groups and dividing students

 

E-mail, chat, conferencing and more

 

Supervision/assessment

 

Peer Review-

Text – Ch. 11

June 5 –   Module 7

Accessibility and Universal Design for Learning

Presenter:  Sheryl Burgstahler, Ph.D.  Director, UW Accessible Technology & DO-IT, UW-IT Affiliate Professor, Education

Peer Review-articulate accessibility and UDL considerations for course

 

June 12 - Module 8

Course Framework/Shell

Module 9

Showcase, Celebrate and Plan Next Steps

 

Areas and content – the platform/LMS

 

Student orientation considerations – preparing them

 

Timing and pacing considerations

 

Communication tools – web 2.0 tools and others

 

Instructor presence

Peer Review-begin to build out Canvas site – share blueprint.

Present draft syllabus and template for one module development.

Share products.

Text – Ch. 6 & 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Summary:

Date Details